Statewide
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March 23, 2010
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Wesley Burt

Poll results show Oklahomans in favor of statewide smoke free law

Oklahoma City � A recent SoonerPoll shows most Oklahomans say they want tougher smoke free laws that protect them from the dangers of secondhand smoke. Results show that 71 percent of Oklahomans favor eliminating all indoor smoking in public places, with 56% of respondents saying that they strongly favor a statewide smoke free law.

SoonerPoll.com, Oklahoma�s public opinion pollster, conducted the scientific study using live interviewers by telephone of 1000 likely voters from Feb. 25 � March 8. This particular question was commissioned by the Oklahoma Smoke Free Coalition. The study has a margin of error of � 3.1 percent.

To see complete charts and figures pertaining to this poll, click here

Secondhand smoke has proven to increase risk for heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and many respiratory illnesses. 29 other states have adopted comprehensive smoking laws and taken steps to protect their workers from the dangers of secondhand smoke. Smoke Free Oklahoma is working with lawmakers to make Oklahoma the 30th state to adopt a similar law.

Results show an overwhelming majority, 94% of Oklahoma voters believe secondhand smoke is a health hazard, with 62.4% believing it is a serious health hazard.

With that in mind, 70.1 percent of Oklahoma voters strongly believe the customers and employees right to breathe clean air in restaurants and bars is more important than the rights of smokers to smoke inside and owners to allow smoking inside restaurants and bars.

The results show that implementation of smoke free laws would not adversely affect commerce, 73.6 percent of Oklahomans and 71.6 percent of smokers will still go out to bars and restaurants as often if smoke free legislation is passed. Nearly 20 percent of respondents said they would go out more often if smoke free legislation were passed.

�As you can see from the polling, Oklahomans know the dangers of second hand smoke and are ready to make Oklahoma a healthier state by making it the 30th state to go smoke free,� Marilyn Davidson, Government Relations Director for the American Heart Association, said.

Wesley Burt
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Wesley Burt